Seattle Businesses: Join the Mayor’s Youth Employment Initiative

Mayor Murray is calling on Seattle employers to participate in the Mayor’s Youth Employment Initiative, which aims to improve connections between Seattle’s youth and employers, and increase employment opportunities for Seattle youth.SYEP Partner Button

You can become a Proud Employer Partner in one of two ways:

  1. Hire a youth intern at $11.00/hr to work part-time for 7-weeks in the Seattle Youth Employment Program, or
  2. Make a contribution of $2,600 to support a youth internship slot.

 Make your pledge today!

 

Seattle Youth Employment Program – Summer Internships

  • 7-week internship for youth ages, 16 to 24
  • Internships start on July 1 and end on August 19
  • Internship hours are up to 25 hours per week; for a total of 175 hours
  • All interns participate in job training preparation prior to internship and are supported by a youth staff member throughout the internship.

 

What can employers expect from the program?

  • A youth intern recruited and prepared by youth staff members for success in the workplace.
  • A single point of contact with a youth staff member who will work with the employer and the intern during the 7 week internship.
  • A match with a youth intern who best fits the skills requirements outlined by the employer.
  • Support for the young person on meeting employer expectations.
  • Support for the employer supervisor on how to best support the youth on the job.
  • Guidance and help with questions about hosting a youth intern.

 

Employers agree to:

  • Provide a structured work environment with clear tasks.
  • Provide supervision for a young person for 25 hours per week for 7 weeks this summer.
  • Participate in an employer supervisor orientation – in person or online.
  • Complete a background check.
  • Obtain a youth work permit for interns ages 16 and 17; (a 10-minute online application; permit is free).
  • Communicate with youth staff member weekly regarding intern’s engagement.

 Make your pledge today!

 

Questions? Contact Nancy Yamamoto in the Office of Economic Development:

nancy.yamamoto@seattle.gov or 206-684-8189

2015 Mayor’s Film Award Recipient Announced: Megan Griffiths

HEADSHOT2015_hayleyyoung_CROPPEDMayor Ed Murray has announced the 2015 recipient of the 10th Annual Mayor’s Award for Outstanding Achievement in Film, Megan Griffiths. The award recognizes an individual or entity for exceptional work that has significantly contributed to the growth, advancement, and reputation of Seattle as a filmmaking city.

“Megan’s passion for filming locally and attracting new business and talent has raised the profile of Seattle and the region’s film community,” said Murray. “Her award-winning career in directing and producing speaks for itself. I am pleased to present this award to her, and thank her for her championship of Seattle as a thriving place to make movies.”

Megan Griffiths has been a director, writer, and producer in the Seattle film community for over a decade. Her most recent film Lucky Them was filmed in Seattle and premiered at the 2013 Toronto International Film Festival. Her previous film, Eden, was set in the southwest but filmed entirely in Washington, and premiered at the 2012 SXSW Film Festival in Austin where it won the narrative Audience Award and the Emergent Female Director Award.

“I am honored to receive the Mayor’s Award for Outstanding Achievement in Film,” said Griffiths. “I feel very privileged to live in a city where the Mayor and the community celebrate the film industry. Seattle is home to many great craftsmen and women who also happen to be outstanding humans and phenomenal collaborators, and I am proud to be able to call this ‘crewtopia’ my home and base of operations.”

The five Seattle film industry representatives on the Nomination and Selection Committee considered many deserving people before reaching a unanimous decision on the 2015 recipient Megan Griffiths. Griffiths will receive Silvered Piccolo Venetian with Emerald Handles created by artist Dale Chihuly. Griffiths received the award at Seattle International Film Festival (SIFF)’s Opening Night Gala on Tuesday, May 14, 2015 at the Seattle Center’s McCaw Hall.

Only in Seattle Newsletter – April 2015

The Only in Seattle newsletter is designed to share resources and information with leaders in Seattle’s neighborhood business districts.

In this edition:

  • Only in Seattle Peer Network;
  • $15 Minimum Wage;
  • Parklet Handbook;
  • Neighborhood Matching Fund;
  • Calendar of Neighborhood Events;
  • and more!

 

View this newsletter in your browser

 

Minimum Wage and Labor Standards

As Seattle’s new minimum wage ordinance takes effect, the Office of Economic Development would like to provide a set of resources for employers and workers to learn about the protections that the City of Seattle provides to workers in Seattle.

Office of Labor Standards

The City of Seattle created the Office of Labor Standards (OLS) within the Office for Civil Rights to increase equity and establish a fair and healthy economy for workers, businesses and residents. OLS enforces Seattle’s labor standards ordinances to protect workers and educate employers on their responsibilities. The OLS site provides resources for employers and workers to submit question or violations. [Read more…]

Special Events in Neighborhood Business Districts: Only in Seattle’s Peer Network Gathering

This month, the Only in Seattle Peer Network gathering dove deep into the world of special events in Seattle and neighborhood business districts. The Special Events Committee, chaired by Chris Swenson, walked through the current process for permitting a special event, talked about the benefits of special events in Seattle, and touched a bit on upcoming policy reform. Also, representatives from three neighborhood business districts presented brief case studies on the positive impacts of specific events in their neighborhood.

Special Events in Seattle

IMG_0458Kicking things off, Chris Swenson shared that in 2014 there were nearly 400 permitted special events compared to 20 in 1991 (that’s when the special events ordinance was adopted into what it is today). The City recognizes that special events build a sense of pride and place, support our creative culture, strengthen community engagement, and produce a positive economic impact for our city.  In other words, that level of growth over the last 24 years is a good thing. The different types of special events include: free public and community events (e.g. Lunar New Year), free speech events (e.g. MLK March), public commercial events (e.g. Red Bull Soapbox Derby), ticketed sporting and cultural events (e.g. Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon), and promotional events. Chris also shared key information on when one needs a special events permit and teed up presentations from the following representatives of the Special Events Committee:

  • Kyle Griggs, Seattle Parks Department
  • Kate Leitch, Seattle Department of Transportation
  • Tom Heun, Seattle Fire Department
  • Henry Doan and Angelo Marfa, King County Public Health
  • Susan Blaker, Washington State Liquor Control Board
  • Karen Ko, Seattle Department of Neighborhoods

Chris wrapped things up with a word about the special events reform process that is currently underway. The 1991 ordinance did a good job at attracting special events, and now needs a closer look at a cost recovery system, appropriate fee levels, process improvements and the City’s vision for special events. Neighborhood business districts were pleased to hear this information early on in the process, and Chris shared that the timeline for reaching out to organizations will be summer 2015, with potential reform ordained in early 2016.

Check out the full PowerPoint presentation below and contact information for representatives from the Special Events Committee.   [Read more…]

OED’s Financing Partners: Only in Seattle’s Peer Network Gathering Recap

IMG_0357The February 27, 2015 Peer Network Gathering began with a simple question: How important is access to capital for small businesses? As neighborhood business district leaders and small business owners introduced themselves, the response was clear that access to capital is one of, if not the, most important resources for small businesses to start and grow.

The City of Seattle’s Office of Economic Development’s (OED) convened neighborhood business district organizations and OED’s financing partners to share resources and build relationships. OED’s financing partners that attended were:

Business District leaders representing 15 different neighborhoods were in attendance to discuss the unique benefits of each resource and how best to communicate or refer businesses to these resources. Lance Randall, Business Retention and Expansion Manager at OED, described the intent of the Grow Seattle partnership between the City and business organizations – to position the local organizations as “go to” experts for business technical assistance in the neighborhood. For more information on this program, please contact Lance Randall at lance.randall@seattle.gov and 206.733.9743.     [Read more…]

Business and property owners: Share your thoughts on solar

The cost of installing a solar energy system is now lower than ever. Although seen as a cloudy state, Washington has great solar potential. With rising electricity bills and state incentives available, the business case for solar makes sense right now.

Organizations around Seattle are partnering to create more options for local businesses to invest in solar energy and want to hear from you! We are seeking input from Seattle commercial property and business owners to help guide future commercial solar energy programs.

Please complete this 5-minute survey by March 12, 2015 and be entered to win one of two $25 dollar gift cards to Cherry Street Coffee. All responses will be used only for these purposes, and will remain confidential. We greatly appreciate your time and input.

The survey is being conducted by the Office of Economic Development, Craft3, NW SEED, SODO BIA, Seattle City Light, and the Office of Sustainability and Environment.

Seattle business owners: Chime in about broadband services

The City of Seattle is looking for input about broadband from Seattle-area businesses. This survey will ask you about your current broadband services and whether they meet your needs; your satisfaction with the services that are currently available to business owners in Seattle; and what you believe the City’s role should be in bringing high-speed connectivity to residents and businesses in Seattle. The survey should take just around 10 minutes to complete. Thank you in advance for your participation!

Take the Broadband Survey