Request for Proposals (RFP) – Regional Green Business Program Administrator

ProgramEnvirostarsLOGOhiqual_SMThe City of Seattle’s Office of Economic Development, on behalf of a newly formed regional partnership, is seeking proposals to become the Program Administrator for the EnviroStars Regional Green Business Program (RGBP). This is a three year contract of approximately $700,000.00. The purpose of the RGBP is to take a regional approach in creating an overarching brand and implement technology tools to better serve local businesses and building owners access environmental services and track and measure outcomes.

Proposals are due at 4:30 p.m. PST on Friday, September 25, 2015 to Lance Randall at the Office of Economic Development lance.randall@Seattle.gov 700 5th Ave Suite 5752. Seattle WA 98104.

View the complete Request for Proposals

Informational Q/A Session
September 1
Floor 60, Room 6070 in the Seattle Municipal Tower
700 5th Ave
11:00 am to 12:30 pm

RFP Questions received from 8/20/15 through 9/1/15 will be posted with answers on this page on 9/4/15.

Seattle to Open Pike/Pine Corridor to Pedestrians on Capitol Hill Saturday

Mayor Ed Murray, the Office of Economic Development, Seattle Department of Transportation and Seattle Police Department with Capitol Hill Housing announced a collaboration to temporarily open sections of Capitol Hill’s Pike/Pine corridor to pedestrians.

The pilot will close a portion of Pike Street on Capitol Hill to motor vehicle traffic on Saturday nights throughout August, increasing pedestrian access in the corridor.

“On these beautiful summer Saturday nights, we want to explore a new opportunity to come together as a community,” said Mayor Ed Murray. “We are going to create a new experience in the heart of one of our most vibrant neighborhoods. As we add music and art, Capitol Hill residents and visitors alike will enjoy a fun and safe atmosphere.”

“This is an exciting piece of a much larger economic development strategy to support a strong, 24-hour economy in Capitol Hill,” said Brian Surratt, Director of the Office of Economic Development. “We’ve been working closely to support both daytime and nighttime businesses who are excited to see what we learn from this pilot.”

“I’ve been impressed with the city’s willingness to work so closely with the stewards, residents and business owners of Capitol Hill on this project. We are a strong and diverse neighborhood, but our needs are changing,” said Shan Foisy, Founder and Creative Director of Capitol Hill business The Soup Standard. “I believe this pilot has everyone’s best interests at heart and I’m excited to see what comes of it.”

• On August 8 and 15, Pike Street between Broadway and 12th will be closed from 10 p.m. to approximately 3 a.m.

• On August 22 and 29, Pike Street will close at 8 p.m., and local businesses and community groups will provide programming that will include a yoga demonstration, drag show, and live string music as people head home. The street will reopen at approximately 3 a.m.

• During the closures, adjacent side streets (10th and 11th Avenues) will be local access only.

• Passenger loading and unloading will occur outside the closure area. Suggested passenger load zones (PLZ) for Taxi/Uber/Lyft include three (3) PLZs on 12th Ave. between Pike and Union, and one (1) PLZ on Union between 11th and 12th.

“Our officers are excited to be able to provide this opportunity to our community,” said East Precinct Captain Paul McDonagh. “When we work together to create a new and exciting community spaces, we make our neighborhoods safer and stronger.”

Mayor’s Youth Employment Initiative develops nearly 2000 opportunities for Seattle youth

DSC00095 - CopyMayor Ed Murray recently announced that his Mayor’s Youth Employment Initiative has created nearly 2,000 positions for young people across the city, from summer jobs through Seattle Parks and other City agencies, to internships at private-sector employers. Financial support from private donors generated twice as many opportunities for Seattle youth as last year.

“In this year’s State of the City, I called for double the number of positions for Seattle youth,” said Seattle Mayor Ed Murray. “Our private-sector leaders are expanding the youth employment program with new opportunities and energy. Through these partnerships, young people will develop new skills for success in the workplace, building toward a bright future.”

To support the effort, JPMorgan Chase awarded the City of Seattle $500,000 over two years to fund youth internships and deliver national best practices to increase employer engagement in the Mayor’s Youth Employment Initiative. Russell Investments and Russell Wilson’s Why Not You Foundation have pledged an additional $75,000 to fund internships.

OED interns speak with the press.

OED interns speak with the press.

“I can think of no better way for the private sector to invest in our city than by embracing our youth,” said Councilmember John Okamoto. “Employers participating in the Mayor’s initiative are developing talent that will drive our economic future.”

Starbucks Coffee Company has hired interns this summer, along with other private sector contributors, including Amazon, Bank of America, The Boeing Company, Center for Infectious Disease Research, Google, Ivar’s, Seattle Children’s Research Institute, Swedish Medical Center, and Vulcan.

In Seattle, the youth unemployment rate is over 13 percent and for low‐income youth and young people of color, it’s even worse. Nationally, youth unemployment is 12.1 percent in June 2015, double the 5.3 percent national average.

“As a major employer and partner of our K-12 schools, community colleges, and non-profit workforce training providers, JPMorgan Chase views closing the Skills Gap and providing meaningful career pathways to good paying jobs as two of the most crucial issues of our time,” said JPMorgan Chase Chairman of the Pacific Northwest, Phyllis Campbell. “We feel our support of the Mayor’s Youth Employment Initiative is an important way we are helping to build the long-term success of the local economy.”

This year, through the Mayor’s Youth Employment Initiative, eligible youth and young adults will receive paid work experience in positions at various city departments and at private sector placements based on their career interest. To date, the City has identified 1,972 positions and expects to surpass the goal of 2,000 opportunities well before the end of the year.

“When you give a young person their first summer job, you’re opening up a pathway to meaningful employment and lifelong opportunity,” said Blair Taylor, chief community officer for Starbucks, which is participating in this year’s program and plans to hire 10,000 disconnected youth across the U.S. by 2018. “This is ultimately about coming together to provide the skills, training and job opportunities young people need to participate in the 21st century economy.”

Employment opportunities for young people not only provide needed income and skills training, they can result in healthier, safer lives for youth. In one Chicago study, for example, young people from high-crime neighborhoods were nearly half as likely to be victims of violent crime when they had summer jobs.

The Mayor’s Youth Employment Initiative has been able to leverage $855,080 of private sector funding to match the $2.5 million investment of the Human Services Department’s General Funds. These contributions were critical for expanding this year’s summer youth employment program, and to further expand the program moving forward.

“Russell Investments is proud to support the much-needed Mayor’s Youth Employment Initiative,” said Len Brennan, president and CEO of Russell Investments. “Increasing employment and internship opportunities for Seattle’s youth continues a nearly 80-year tradition of helping improve the quality of life for people in the communities where our associates live and work.”

The summer internship program is open to youth and young adults, ages 14-24 who live in Seattle. In 2015, Mayor’s Youth Employment Initiative received over 3,700 internship applications, up from 432 youth applications last year—an increase of 81 percent.

It is expected that the demand of young people seeking employment will continue to grow in the coming years.

To ensure that all eligible youth are able to participate in the program, the City of Seattle is inviting additional employers to participate either by hosting internships next summer or during the school year. If employers are unable to host interns, they can contribute to the pool of funds to pay the wages of students placed at other companies.

Request for Proposals: Manufacturing Incubator

Innovative Incubator to Help Grow Manufacturing Businesses

Mayor Ed Murray has announced a $100,000 Request for Proposals (RFP) for a partner to help develop a manufacturing incubator that will benefit multiple emerging or expanding manufacturing businesses.

“Seattle is known for innovation and we see creativity happening in every sector of our economy,” said Murray. “This incubator will help local manufacturers find new ways of doing business, foster new ideas, and develop new partnerships.”

Download the RFP

Seattle’s manufacturing sector is a vital contributor to the city’s economy and in itself, represents a wide range of sub sectors, including maritime, industrial machinery and fabricated metal, aerospace, printing and publishing, stone, clay, glass and concrete products, home and office furnishings, food and beverage production, construction, and transportation and wholesale distribution.

Unlike other sectors, manufacturing businesses have more complex, and often more expensive space, infrastructure and equipment needs, making it difficult for small businesses in this sector to take root. These funds will help emerging and expanding manufacturing businesses overcome these cost barriers, establish themselves, and contribute to job growth.

“A manufacturing incubator will build essential connections between emerging entrepreneurs and support new collaboration in the manufacturing sector,” said Mark Morel, vice president/co-owner of Morel Industries, a Seattle-based foundry. “When our partners, suppliers, and customers are stronger, we are stronger.”

Additionally the incubator space can be critical for cultivating a collaborative environment for entrepreneurial development. A key outcome of this RFP is the creation of an incubator that consists of co-located, intentionally selected tenants with the goal of encouraging the manufacturing of complimentary goods, networking, sharing of information, and mentoring.

The objectives of this partnership are to:

  • identify, catalyze, or provide incentives for incubator projects that will benefit manufacturing businesses;
  • utilize shared equipment to reduce costs and create affordable space for new and existing small manufacturers, allowing them to grow and collaborate;
  • retain and create new employment in the manufacturing sector; and
  • expand the number and diversity of successful businesses in Seattle’s manufacturing sector.

This manufacturing incubator is funded by fees generated by the City’s New Markets Tax Credits (“NMTCs”) program, a federal tax credit financing tool. NMTCs attract private investment to important development and business projects benefitting low-income neighborhoods.

The City’s Office of Economic Development created the Seattle Investment Fund LLC (SIF) in 2008 to participate in the NMTCs program with the goal of attracting financing for catalytic business and real estate projects in Seattle’s under invested communities. The SIF earns program fees through the NMTCs program. A portion of these fees is set aside to invest in small businesses in Seattle.

Examples of commercial and business projects using these tax credits are: Stadium Place, Retail Lockbox, Bullitt Center, INSCAPE building, and the Pike Place Market renovation. Fees on these investment projects have allowed the City and SIF to support small business growth, including: façade improvements for businesses in the Chinatown/International District, the Central Area, Columbia City, and Othello Business District, and also additional small business lending activity through the Office of Economic Development and the National Development Council’s Grow Seattle Fund.

“Investing in emerging local businesses that create products right here in Seattle is smart business for the City,” said Seattle City Councilmember John Okamoto, Investment Committee member of the Seattle Investment Fund LLC. “Our local manufacturers range from food and beverage makers to metal fabricators, and it’s great that the City and the Seattle Investment Fund LLC are using the fees from our New Markets Tax Credits in an innovative way to support them.”

Information Sessions and Application Deadline:

The Office of Economic Development will provide two information sessions to assist potential applicants in preparing their submissions. This will provide the opportunity for applicants to ask any questions regarding project criteria and the RFP process. Sessions will be July 22, 2015 and August 19, 2015 from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the City of Seattle Office of Economic Development’s office at 700 Fifth Avenue, Ste 5752.

Download the RFP

Deadline for submission of proposals is no later than 5:00 p.m. on September 4, 2015.

A total of $100,000 of funds is available to recipients that meet the qualifications of this RFP.

For more information about this RFP, please contact AJ Cari, Business Finance Specialist at the City of Seattle Office of Economic Development, (206) 684-0133, or aj.cari@seattle.gov.

Seattle Working to Expand Green Business Program

Seattle’s Green Business Program has teamed up with King County, the City of Bellevue, the City of Kirkland, Puget Sound Energy and others to better coordinate existing green business programs to deliver simplified, technology-friendly, cost-effective access to “green” services for businesses.

The regional program is based on the California Green Business Network (CAGBN), and aims to be a one-stop-shop of online resource of best practices and a customized service referral system for businesses.

Businesses will access a web portal, input basic information about their business, and receive a tailored menu of green actions. Services such as technical assistance, rebates, and recognition will be available from participating government and private/non-profit partners, and through a public-facing directory on the website.

“A regional collaboration to support business access to environmental services will be a great win,” said Matt Galvin, CEO and Co-owner Pagliacci Pizza. “It is often confusing and challenging to navigate what is available for our locations throughout the Puget Sound region.”

Key features will also include coordinated business outreach and public relations under a common brand. The program will make it easier for businesses and building owners to engage with existing city, county, and utility programs to implement green practices and receive technical support. The partnership will also help consumers connect with participating green businesses.

As part of Seattle’s overall commitment to sustainability, the Green Business Program has been helping local businesses install hundreds of sink aerators and efficient toilets, provided hundreds of spill kits and free waste audits and assisted with energy efficient improvements. These utility savings reduce businesses costs and gain a competitive edge, while contributing to a clean and healthy community.

To keep updated on the progress of this effort, visit Seattle’s Green Business Program.

Resources for Businesses, Business District Org Structures, and more — Only in Seattle Peer Network Gatherings

On May 28, 2015, the Office of Economic Development (OED) hosted the second Business Retention and Expansion Partnership Peer Network Gathering. The first gathering in February focused on access to capital, and each of OED’s financing partners described how they are able to meet the various needs of business owners. While most of us agree that access to capital is one of, if not, the most important aspect to launching and growing a small business, technical assistance, resources, and support increase a business’ chances of long-term success. The good news is that OED’s experts are available to provide that technical assistance directly to businesses. Three experts from OED presented at the March Peer Network Gathering and shared how they are able to help.

IMG_0709Stephanie Gowing, Green Business Advocate, shared conservation services to help your business reduce utility bills, meet regulatory obligations, and lower operating costs. Also, Get on the Map is a unique opportunity for businesses to go green and receive free positive media attention at the same time. Coming soon is the Regional Green Business Program, a partnership with regional agencies to centralize resources, coordinate outreach and marketing, increase utilization for existing programs, and reward business’ environmental accomplishments. For more information, please contact Stephanie Gowing at stephanie.gowing@seattle.gov or 206-684-3698.

James Kelly, Small Business Advocate, discussed the perils of construction for a small business. James’ responsibility is to establish a direct line of communication with business and property owners impacted by construction, provide businesses with connections to training and capacity building, and manage marketing and promotional campaigns for business districts impacted by construction. Given Seattle’s construction boom right now, James is in demand and always willing to help. As an example, James finds unique ways to partner with developers and private parking lots for additional parking for construction workers during times when construction reduces the amount of parking for local businesses. For inquires related to construction impacts to businesses, please contact James Kelly at james.kelly2@seattle.gov or 206-684-8612.

Jennifer Tam, Restaurant Advocate, is the City’s main point of contact if you have any questions regarding your food business. Jennifer is here to help whether you are a restaurant, food cart, commercial kitchen, home-based food business, or anything in between. The Restaurant Success online portal is a good place to start if you have questions about starting or growing your food business. Jennifer can help with permitting, site-selection assistance, navigating the regulatory landscape, and more. Feel free to contact Jennifer for any questions you have at jennifer.tam@seattle.gov or 206-684-3436.

Through the Business Retention and Expansion partnership with local chambers of commerce, businesses can access support from these experts to help start, grow, or green their businesses. Check out the full presentation below.

 

Business District Organization Structures and Small Business Support

On April 30, business district leaders met over lunch at Big Chickie in Hillman City to talk shop. On the agenda was a topic that some business districts struggle with: What organizational structure is most successful and sustainable? While there is no right and easy answer for that, leaders stepped up to share successes and challenges of their own organizational structures, and how daily operations function. Rob Mohn of the Columbia City Business Association (CCBA) shared an overview of CCBA’s all-volunteer model and the evolution of the version that exists today. CCBA’s organizational structure relies heavily on volunteer hours from folks on four main committees: Goodwill, Marketing, Membership, and Business Development, and the public safety and cleanliness work is supported by the Business Improvement Area (BIA). A few keys to success from CCBA are: defining a reasonable geography, focusing on business district concerns and not overall neighborhood issues, and cultivating partnerships. Georgetown and Beacon Hill are similar in that they have paid staff, a 501(c)(3) designation, and rely on grants, sponsorship, and membership revenue to support events and existing programs. Challenges with both models seem to be sustainability and the amount of donated time by volunteers and board members in order to produce effective results. Continue reading the meeting notes for more information.

While a siesta was in order after the “pollo a la brasa,” folks were energized to talk about small business retention amidst all the growth and development pressures in Seattle. What can the City do to support small businesses better? What tools can OED offer and are there innovative tools that the City can adopt to support small businesses? While the concern was real, there were also potential solutions that were presented: Better access to technical assistance providers to support small business retention, and a handbook or resource guide to learn about what the City can do to help and how communities can access these resources were two ideas thrown out there. With that in mind, check out the following:

Some existing resources for communities to access:

  • Engage with the Design Review Board; DRB can convey community priorities to developers
  • Be an organized and proactive community, engage in local Land Use Review Committees
  • Explore Historic Districts and Landmark Preservation models
  • Find out if you are eligible for financing through Section 108 or New Markets Tax Credits
  • Access business technical assistance resources through the Business Retention and Expansion Partnership

Here are areas where the City can provide more assistance:

  • A guidebook for Department of Planning and Development to focus on the policy and review process
  • Engage in round table discussions with businesses and neighborhood planning
  • Retain affordable commercial space
  • Coordinate permitting processes to mitigate construction impacts on small businesses

Check out the meeting notes for more information. If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out to OED and we will be happy to help.

Seattle Businesses: Join the Mayor’s Youth Employment Initiative

Mayor Murray is calling on Seattle employers to participate in the Mayor’s Youth Employment Initiative, which aims to improve connections between Seattle’s youth and employers, and increase employment opportunities for Seattle youth.SYEP Partner Button

You can become a Proud Employer Partner in one of two ways:

  1. Hire a youth intern at $11.00/hr to work part-time for 7-weeks in the Seattle Youth Employment Program, or
  2. Make a contribution of $2,600 to support a youth internship slot.

 Make your pledge today!

 

Seattle Youth Employment Program – Summer Internships

  • 7-week internship for youth ages, 16 to 24
  • Internships start on July 1 and end on August 19
  • Internship hours are up to 25 hours per week; for a total of 175 hours
  • All interns participate in job training preparation prior to internship and are supported by a youth staff member throughout the internship.

 

What can employers expect from the program?

  • A youth intern recruited and prepared by youth staff members for success in the workplace.
  • A single point of contact with a youth staff member who will work with the employer and the intern during the 7 week internship.
  • A match with a youth intern who best fits the skills requirements outlined by the employer.
  • Support for the young person on meeting employer expectations.
  • Support for the employer supervisor on how to best support the youth on the job.
  • Guidance and help with questions about hosting a youth intern.

 

Employers agree to:

  • Provide a structured work environment with clear tasks.
  • Provide supervision for a young person for 25 hours per week for 7 weeks this summer.
  • Participate in an employer supervisor orientation – in person or online.
  • Complete a background check.
  • Obtain a youth work permit for interns ages 16 and 17; (a 10-minute online application; permit is free).
  • Communicate with youth staff member weekly regarding intern’s engagement.

 Make your pledge today!

 

Questions? Contact Nancy Yamamoto in the Office of Economic Development:

nancy.yamamoto@seattle.gov or 206-684-8189

2015 Mayor’s Film Award Recipient Announced: Megan Griffiths

HEADSHOT2015_hayleyyoung_CROPPEDMayor Ed Murray has announced the 2015 recipient of the 10th Annual Mayor’s Award for Outstanding Achievement in Film, Megan Griffiths. The award recognizes an individual or entity for exceptional work that has significantly contributed to the growth, advancement, and reputation of Seattle as a filmmaking city.

“Megan’s passion for filming locally and attracting new business and talent has raised the profile of Seattle and the region’s film community,” said Murray. “Her award-winning career in directing and producing speaks for itself. I am pleased to present this award to her, and thank her for her championship of Seattle as a thriving place to make movies.”

Megan Griffiths has been a director, writer, and producer in the Seattle film community for over a decade. Her most recent film Lucky Them was filmed in Seattle and premiered at the 2013 Toronto International Film Festival. Her previous film, Eden, was set in the southwest but filmed entirely in Washington, and premiered at the 2012 SXSW Film Festival in Austin where it won the narrative Audience Award and the Emergent Female Director Award.

“I am honored to receive the Mayor’s Award for Outstanding Achievement in Film,” said Griffiths. “I feel very privileged to live in a city where the Mayor and the community celebrate the film industry. Seattle is home to many great craftsmen and women who also happen to be outstanding humans and phenomenal collaborators, and I am proud to be able to call this ‘crewtopia’ my home and base of operations.”

The five Seattle film industry representatives on the Nomination and Selection Committee considered many deserving people before reaching a unanimous decision on the 2015 recipient Megan Griffiths. Griffiths will receive Silvered Piccolo Venetian with Emerald Handles created by artist Dale Chihuly. Griffiths received the award at Seattle International Film Festival (SIFF)’s Opening Night Gala on Tuesday, May 14, 2015 at the Seattle Center’s McCaw Hall.

Only in Seattle Newsletter – April 2015

The Only in Seattle newsletter is designed to share resources and information with leaders in Seattle’s neighborhood business districts.

In this edition:

  • Only in Seattle Peer Network;
  • $15 Minimum Wage;
  • Parklet Handbook;
  • Neighborhood Matching Fund;
  • Calendar of Neighborhood Events;
  • and more!

 

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